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Akron Children's Hospital 2015 Campaign

Akron Children's Hospital – Own your medical care.

Own your medical care. Partner with your doctor. Have a voice. Akron Children’s Hospital wants patients and their parents fully involved in decisions about their care and treatment. And the best way to demonstrate that commitment to partnership is by telling stories. Real stories. Ones with kids, their parents and their doctors talking about their experiences – both funny and poignant. Like how Codey figured out – with his doctors’ support – how to rework his chemotherapy treatment schedule so he could attend an important trip with his classmates. Or how Elizabeth’s parents found the support they needed to help their daughter thrive, despite the challenges of living with cerebral palsy.
 
The ad campaign, which launched in multiple phases in 2015, is further supported by a digital component with advice-driven content. Not your typical medical counsel from doctors but from parents and patients, with answers to the questions you don’t always ask doctors – like what advice would you give a parent of a child facing a serious illness? It’s what kids and parents facing medical challenges want to see and hear, and it’s coming from the people who understand. And it’s delivered in a short, easy-to-digest format that helps the message resonate.
 
The campaign was effective not just because it told great stories but because it was rooted in data. Marcus Thomas conducted the first-ever comprehensive, national research to better understand how Millennial parents make pediatric healthcare decisions; we used the results, along with secondary research, to guide the campaign strategy aimed at Millennials. The research findings showed us exactly how different Millennial parents are than parents from older generations so we could appeal to the things that matter most to them – like being a part of their hospital selection journey online, making sure their children’s voices are heard and valued, and providing the kind of advice they’re continuously seeking.